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Frederick the Great was an eighteenth century king of Prussia also nicknamed "der alte Fritz" ("Old Fritz"). (read more)

Featured Article: Darwinism

Charles Darwin
Darwinism is a term that is generally considered synonymous with the theory of natural selection. This theory, which was developed by Charles Darwin, holds that natural selection is the directive or creative force of evolution.

The term "Darwinism" also has been applied to the evolutionary theories of Charles Darwin in general, rather than just the theory of natural selection. It may also refer specifically to the role of Charles Darwin as opposed to others in the history of evolutionary thought—particularly contrasting Darwin's results with those of earlier theories, such as Lamarckism, or with more modern versions, such as the modern evolutionary synthesis.

According to Ernst Mayr (1991), how the term "Darwinism" has been and is used depends on who is using it and the time period. On the other hand, the late Harvard evolutionist Stephen Jay Gould maintains that although the popular literature often equates Darwinism with evolution itself, the scientific community generally agrees that the term "should be restricted to the worldview encompassed by the theory of natural selection" (Gould 1982). That is, the term should be limited to the philosophical concept of Darwin's theory regarding the mechanism for evolutionary change.

Since the time of the publication of Darwin's Origin of Species (1859), Darwinism has confronted challenges from both the scientific and religious communities.

Popular Article: Alexander the Great

Bust of Alexander III
Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (July 356 B.C.E. – June 10, 323 B.C.E.), commonly known in the West as Alexander the Great or Alexander III of Macedon, King of Macedon (336–323 B.C.E.), was the most successful military commander of ancient history, conquering most of the known world before his death. Alexander is known in Middle Persian literature as Alexander the Cursed due to his burning of the Persian capital and national library.

Alexander integrated non-Greeks into his army and administration, leading some scholars to credit him with a “policy of fusion.” He encouraged marriage between Greeks and non-Greeks, and practiced it himself. This was extremely unusual for the ancient world. His conquests ushered in centuries of Greco-Macedonian settlement and rule over non-Greek areas, a period known as the Hellenistic Age. Alexander himself lived on in the history and myth of both Greek and non-Greek peoples. Already during his lifetime, and especially after his death, his exploits inspired a literary tradition in which he appears as a towering legendary hero in the tradition of Homer's Achilles.