Info:Did you know


Aleut

Many Aleuts became Christian, joining the Russian Orthodox Church during the years when Russian fur traders settled in Alaska

Igbo People

In the 1960s the Igbo attempted to secede from Nigeria and form the independent Republic of Biafra

Paiute

Northern Paiute shaman, Wovoka, received instructions on how to perform the Ghost Dance as a way to achieve peace

Herbert of Cherbury

Herbert of Cherbury is best known as the "father of Deism"

Sasquatch

Although sightings of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch, continue to be reported the majority of scientist remain skeptical about the existence of such a creature

Naturalization

The term naturalization originates in the concept of "natural born" citizens

John Michael Wright

John Michael Wright was commissioned to paint several royal portraits and paintings of aristocracy, but did not receive the title "King's Painter" nor did he receive a knighthood

Napoleon Bonaparte

Contrary to popular belief, Napoleon was actually slightly taller than an average Frenchman of the nineteenth century

Tuareg

For over two millennia, the Tuareg operated the trans-Saharan caravan trade connecting the great cities on the southern edge of the Sahara to the northern Mediterranean coast of Africa.

Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove

Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove, third century Chinese Taoist scholars, inspired generations of poets and painters

Dario Fo

The 1997 Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to Italian playwright Dario Fo

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was buried with full military honors at Fort Hill Cemetery in Auburn, New York

Aaron Burr

Aaron Burr famously dueled with Alexander Hamilton, mortally wounding him

Constantine I

Constantine the Great was the first Roman Emperor to accept Christianity

Gentile

The word "gentile," used to translate the Hebrew "goy," derives from the Latin word "gentilis" meaning descended from a common ancestor

Yoruba People

The Yoruba are one of the largest ethno-linguistic groups in sub-Saharan Africa with "Yorubaland" spanning parts of the modern states of Nigeria, Benin, and Togo

Maya Plisetskaya

Russian ballerina Maya Plisetskaya danced "Swan Lake" 800 times and was known as "Queen of the air"

Axiology

Axiology is the philosophical study of value

Xiuzhen

Xiuzhen means “to practice and learn the way of the truth” and is the principal technique in the Taoist quest for immortality

Cain and Abel

The story of Cain and Abel in Genesis tells of the first human murder when Cain killed his brother Abel

Lascaux

There is a prehistoric cave painting of a "unicorn" in the Hall of Bulls

Alabama

Alabama is unofficially nicknamed the Yellowhammer State, after the state bird, and is also known as the "Heart of Dixie"

Pop music

Pop music is generally understood to be commercially recorded music with the goal of having mass audience appeal, with the result that its style changes significantly depending on the time and place

Tibet

The Tibetan Plateau is the highest region on earth

John Logie Baird

Scottish inventor John Logie Baird was the first to demonstrate a working television

Mishima Yukio

Twentieth century Japanese author Mishima Yukio performed "seppuku"-ritual suicide-to end his life

Midden

The origin of the word "midden" is Scandinavian and means "manure pile"

Great Barrier Reef

The Great Barrier Reef can be seen from space

Papua New Guinea

The motto of Papua New Guinea is "Unity in Diversity"

Ezekiel

Ezekiel prophesied the return of the Jews to Jerusalem, the rebuilding of the Temple, and the coming of the Messianic King

Ethel Merman

Tony Award winning star of musical theater Ethel Merman never took singing lessons

Edward Rutledge

Edward Rutledge was the youngest of all the signers of the Declaration of Independence

Inuit

Inuit is a term that encompasses the Indigenous peoples who live in the Arctic regions of Alaska, Greenland, and Canada, and Siberia although some prefer to be called by their own name, such as Kalaallit in Greenland and [[Inupiat]

Walter Lippmann

Walter Lippmann was the first to bring the phrase "Cold War" to common currency in his 1947 book by the same name

Urie Bronfenbrenner

Developmental psychologist Urie Bronfenbrenner believed that children need sustained interaction with their parents and a supportive society in order to develop into successful adults

Battle of Vicksburg

The Confederate surrender at Vicksburg is sometimes considered the turning point of the American Civil War

Treason

In the past treason, the betrayal of one's nation, was considered the worst crime, with punishment even more serious than for murder

Indus River

The Indus is the most important river in Pakistan providing essential water for its economy

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight "Ike" Eisenhower was the 34th President of the United States, from 1953 until 1961

Indus Valley Civilization

The Indus Valley Civilization had an advanced urban culture, with streets laid out in a grid pattern, advanced architecture and impressive sewage and drainage systems